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18 styles,
2020
  • Desktop
    $480
  • Web
    $480
  • App
    $600
48px
Graphik Armenian ThinGraphik Armenian Thin
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
48px
Graphik Armenian Thin ItalicGraphik Armenian Thin Italic
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
48px
Graphik Armenian ExtralightGraphik Armenian Extralight
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
48px
Graphik Armenian LightGraphik Armenian Light
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
48px
Graphik Armenian Light ItalicGraphik Armenian Light Italic
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
48px
Graphik Armenian RegularGraphik Armenian Regular
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
48px
Graphik Armenian MediumGraphik Armenian Medium
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
48px
Graphik Armenian Medium ItalicGraphik Armenian Medium Italic
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
48px
Graphik Armenian SemiboldGraphik Armenian Semibold
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
48px
Graphik Armenian BoldGraphik Armenian Bold
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
48px
Graphik Armenian Bold ItalicGraphik Armenian Bold Italic
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
48px
Graphik Armenian BlackGraphik Armenian Black
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
48px
Graphik Armenian Black ItalicGraphik Armenian Black Italic
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
48px
Graphik Armenian SuperGraphik Armenian Super
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
48px
Graphik Armenian Super ItalicGraphik Armenian Super Italic
  • Desktop
    $60
  • Web
    $60
  • App
    $75
About

Designed to be a blank slate, Graphik is a “vanilla-flavored” typeface that is perfectly suited for whatever style of expression is needed. Its purposeful, elegant plainness allows it to move effortlessly between being a central design element or playing a supporting role in a wide range of projects and applications

The inspiration for Graphik came from designer Christian Schwartz’s longstanding interest in the expressive possibilities found in plain typefaces. This stems from his early exposure to Modernist graphic design, particularly posters, from the mid-twentieth century. While many of these designs were dominated by the three iconic sans serifs from Europe: Helvetica, Univers, and Futura, Schwartz was drawn to the “B-list” of sans serifs. The lighter weights of Graphik were influenced by Neuzeit Grotesk, Folio, Recta, and Maxima, while the heavier ones descend from Plak, a wood display typeface, designed by Paul Renner in 1920s.

The low contrast and large x-height give the typeface great versatility. It is suitable for display purposes as well as for text sizes, captions and for such specific tasks as navigation systems and map-making. The typeface is available in weights with corresponding italics, each with five sets of figures.

First drawn as the house style for Schwartzco Inc., it was further developed for Condé Nast Portfolio and later for Wallpaper* and T, the New York Times Style Magazine. Graphik was released as a retail font in 2009. The Cyrillic extension was designed by Ilya Ruderman (CSTM Fonts) in 2015. By the way, this very text is set in Graphik.

The concept of Graphik has been translated to Armenian by Khajag Apelian. The Armenian glyphs, with their reduced x-height and longer descenders, have different vertical proportions from the original Latin, in order for Armenian text to look visually balanced — both on its own and in multilingual applications. Some stroke endings or letter additions, classically considered to be fundamental parts in letters like the Զ, Է and Ջ, were simplified and in some cases entirely removed. A number of contextual alternates help to split the difference between using traditional structures while preventing distracting collisions between letterforms.

Features

Case sensitive forms, standard ligatures, contextual ligatures, proportional lining figures, proportional oldstyle figures, tabular lining figures, tabular oldstyle figures, ordinals, fractions, denominator, numerator, subscript / inferiors, superscript / superiors, three stylistic sets

Languages

Afrikaans, Armenian, Catalan, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Finnish, French, Gaelic (Irish), Galician, German, Hungarian, Icelandic, Italian, Kurdish (lat), Latvian, Lithuanian, Mongolian (lat), Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Spain, Swedish, Turkish, Uzbek (lat)

Authors

Christian Schwartz

Christian Schwartz, a type designer and one of the founders of the type foundry Commercial Type, lives and works in New York. A graduate of Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pa., he worked for a time at MetaDesign in Berlin. After returning to the United States, he worked at type studio Font Bureau, going independent in 2001. In 2007, he and London designer Paul Barnes founded Commercial Type. The studio’s projects include typefaces for The Guardian, Esquire, T (The New York Times Style Magazine), the Empire State Building and Sprint. Also in 2007 Schwartz was awarded the prestigious Prix Charles Peignot, given to designers under 35 years of age for “outstanding contributions to type design.” He has been on the short list of the Museum of Design, in London, as Designer of the Year and was rated among the top 40 most influential designers under 40 years of age by Wallpaper* and on Time’s list of top 100 designers.

Typefaces by Christian Schwartz: FF Bau, Farnham, Graphik, Guardian, Neue Haas Grotesk, Kommissar, Neutraface, Produkt, Stag

Commercial Type

Based in New York and London, Commercial Type is a joint venture between Paul Barnes and Christian Schwartz, who have collaborated since 2004 on various typeface projects, most notably the award winning Guardian Egyptian. The company publishes retail fonts developed by Barnes and Schwartz, their staff, and outside collaborators, and also represents the two and their team when they work together on type design projects. Following the redesign of The Guardian, the team headed by Mark Porter, including Barnes and Schwartz, was awarded the coveted Black Pencil by the D&AD. The team was also nominated for the Design Museum’s “Designer of the Year” prize. In September 2006, Barnes and Schwartz were named two of the 40 most influential designers under 40 in Wallpaper*.

Khajag Apelian

Khajag Apelian is a lettering artist, type and graphic designer. Having grown up between Dubai and Beirut, and being raised in an Armenian family, Khajag has an affinity for different languages and writing systems, which he has applied to the development of typefaces in many scripts, including Arabic, Armenian, and Latin. He designed Arek, a typeface that was awarded the Grand Prize at Granshan 2010 Type Design Competition, and was among the winners of Letter.2, the 2nd international type design competition organized by the Association Typographique Internationale (ATypI). He currently operates under the name “debakir” (Armenian for “printed type”), and is in constant collaboration with different type foundries and design studios, such as Commercial Type, Bold Monday, Typotheque and Morcos Key. He has worked with various international brands including IBM, Apple, Samsung and Disney ME. Khajag also teaches design courses at the American University of Beirut.

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